Text Box: As always, we set aside February to stress dental health in our patients.  See below and our back page for info on special savings on dental care this month.  Pictured at right is a common problem we see in dogs, a slab fracture of the 4th premolar or carnassial tooth.  This is a painful condition that usually results from biting down or chewing on a hard object, which shears off the outer surface of the tooth.  It can be quite hard to see if you don’t look closely, as the fractured part tends to fall back into place.  My clients are always surprised that the pet usually continues to eat.  This is typical of dental pain– I rarely see a pet who won’t eat, even with very painful conditions, but if you look closely you may notice they only chew on one side of their mouth or they may no longer use their favorite chew toys.  In performance dogs, I often notice they are reluctant to Text Box: In the photo above, this is a fairly fresh fracture;  the uneven surface will cause calculus to build up more quickly if it is not addressed.  This dog had a relatively light buildup of calculus making it easier to see the problem.  There was a strong odor associated with the tooth and if you look closely you can see where there was some trauma to the gum, likely at the same time the tooth was fractured.  In this instance we started the dog on antibiotics and pain medication and removed the tooth a few days later.  The mouth odor improved dramatically after just a day or two on antibiotics, and when we extracted the tooth  it was infected and the pulp cavity was compromised.  This is one Text Box: of the largest teeth in the mouth, with three roots, so prior to extracting it we actually cut it in half to make removal easier.  In some cases, referral to a veterinary dentist for restoration may be an option– my first sheltie had the same injury and had a root canal and gold crown placed!
     Dental disease is not only uncomfortable for your pet and affects their overall health, it impacts on your relationship as well– who wants to kiss or snuggle with someone whose breath could clear the room?  Most pets have significant dental disease by 3-4 years of age.  Proper dental care includes brushing at home if possible (at least 1-2 times weekly to make a difference) and professional cleanings at our office as well as taking care of any periodontal disease or damaged teeth that we find.  Take advantage of our specials this month and make your pet  a pleasure to have around!
Text Box: February is Pet Dental Health Month!
Text Box: Special savings on dental care
Text Box: 	During February we offer a 10% discount on dental prophylaxis (teeth cleaning).  This includes anesthesia, monitoring, dental cleaning and polishing, and fluoride treatment.  Extractions and additional medications are not included.  	Because many of our dental patients are geriatric, we recommend pre-anesthetic Text Box: bloodwork to help identify any underlying health issues.  For the month of February we will also offer a FREE   urinalysis with  the full pre-op screening panel (cbc, chemistry panel, and urinalysis) for pets scheduled for dental procedures.  This bloodwork needs to be done at least 48 hour prior to the procedure (see back page for more Text Box: details).  If your pet has not been examined recently, we may need to do a physical prior to the procedure as well  (minimum requirement is a physical exam within the last year, but depending upon your pet’s health we may need a more recent exam).  Our dental special starts now ;  spots tend to fill fast, so call TODAY for an appointment!

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Savings on routine dentals and health panels

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